Green Space

Lyde Green was once fields, farmland and woodland and remnants of this still survive amongst the building development.
More formal green space is planned but it is very limited.

There is some common land in Lyde Green. There are two large fields at the end of Howsmoor Lane that make up Lyde Green Common and can be used by residents as common land/green space. (See our Lyde Green Common Page).

Blackwell Common, on Feynman Way (North) - by the Science Park, isn't designated as a common, and is privately owned and managed by the Science Park. The planning permission for the land does refer to its intended use as a place for a variety of uses though e.g. Events space etc.

The green space around the Folly Brook tributary and ancillary drainage ponds (the Lyde Green Lakes by the Science Park and streams around Lyde Green) are Open Land and therefore also available for public access. It is important to remember these are sites of Nature Conservation Interest and biodiverse wildlife habitats, and care should be taken not to disturb the wildlife in these areas.

There is also be more green space available to use including play areasa BMX area and Sports pitches (which will be ready in the upcoming months).

The green space (by Willowherb/Pear Tree Way and the Taylor Wimpey Office and show homes) is privately owned space. It has been earmarked for housing since day one so will not be green long-term but will eventually have 11 homes built on it.

Types of Green Space

Green space is land that is partly or completely covered with grass, trees, shrubs, or other vegetation. Green space includes formally developed areas like parks, community gardens, and cemeteries, but also includes woodland, wetlands, open space and common land.

Open Access space or Open Land is any open piece of land that is undeveloped (has no buildings or other built structures) and is accessible to the public.

Common land is owned, either by the local council, privately, or by the National Trust. You usually have the right to roam which means you can access and use land for walking, running, watching wildlife and climbing. You are usually not allowed to ride horses, camp, light fires, drive or cycle where you have a right to roam unless there is express permission from land owners or there is a bridle way/cycle path that runs across the land.

Right to Roam is the access given to the public on open space or common land. It means you can access and use land for walking, running, watching wildlife and climbing without needing to stick to public footpaths. You are usually not allowed to ride horses, camp, light fires, drive or cycle where you have a right to roam unless there is express permission from land owners or there is a bridle way/cycle path that runs across the land.

Town & Village Greens can be used for sports and recreation, eg. playing football or walking your dog. Many greens are owned and maintained by local parish or community councils. Some are privately owned. You can often use these areas to hold events but you will need permission first.

Conservation

RSPCA: Visit the RSPCA website for contact info and advice or to report an injured or mistreated animal (including birds).

RSPB: Visit the RSPB website for contact info and advice on wildlife including birds, trees, butterflies and bees.

Walking in Lyde Green

What can I find?

Edible Plants

Lyde Green is full of edible plants to forage if you know where to look! Lime tree leaves, elderflower, blackberries, nettles and edible mushrooms can all be found, but be careful - if you're not sure what you're doing, don't risk it, as if you pick the wrong types or eat the wrong parts of the plant, it could be poisonous!

Ancient Fossils

A rare mares tail tree fossil formed 220 million years ago was found in Lyde Green on a nature walk in 2016

Planning Changes to Common Land

Planned changes to common land will be advertised in local newspapers and put on signs around the land. If you want to comment on the application, write to:

The Commons Team
The Planning Inspectorate
3F Temple Quay House
2 The Square
Temple Quay
Bristol
BS1 6PN

Email: commonlandcasework@pins.gsi.gov.uk
Telephone: 0303 444 5637

It's important that residents keep an eye out for open spaces being de-registered or protections being removed; this is particularly important for the Common and the hedgerows on Howsmoor Lane.

Emersons Green Town Council requested that the hedgerows on Howsmoor Lane be protected but this was rejected by South Gloucestershire Council, meaning that if they choose to widen the roads in the future, the old hedges could be removed. It would be best to have the hedgerows designated as local green space to protect original trees, hedges and verge grass - these form a wildlife corridor through the new development which is crucial for the conservation of wildlife species.

In the past, hedgerows on Emersons Green lane (a similar lane to Howsmoor) were included in the original housing development plan, but years later, residents and others encroached on the hedgerows and ancient trees were maliciously destroyed. It's important that this doesn't happen to Howsmoor Lane in the future.